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The Threshold Policy

As a leader you are judged, fairly, or unfairly by your team's performance, that is after all one of your primary responsibilities, ensuring that your team delivers (and of course growing new leaders). Achieving this can bring great success, failing to results may well result in a shorter term at the helm than you planned, just ask any soccer manager!

As a leader you pay attention to many things, the results on the board, the team's attendance, how they work together, are they delivering hopefully are you helping them develop and grow and so on. So here is my question, are you focused on perhaps the most important element of your team? Do you know what it even is?

The Threshold Policy 

As a leader you are judged, fairly, or unfairly by your team's performance, that is after all one of your primary responsibilities, ensuring that your team delivers (and of course growing new leaders). Achieving this can bring great success, failing to results may well result in a shorter term at the helm than you planned, just ask any soccer manager!

As a leader you pay attention to many things, the results on the board, the team's attendance, how they work together, are they delivering hopefully are you helping them develop and grow and so on. So here is my question, are you focused on perhaps the most important element of your team? Do you know what it even is? 

The Importance of the Policy 

So why is it important that you have a policy? Well, have you ever worked in a team where someone just didn't fit? (maybe it was you!) They just seem like a square peg in a round hole. Their values are perhaps different, their work ethic, the spread of knowledge, their drive. Whatever it is they just don't fit and as a result, they become a de-motivator to the team. Some you catch on to really quickly, others, well they have a little higher Emotional Intelligence than others they can spin and charm they way through most things and it takes a little while to find them. The clue is that your existing great people are spiraling downward in motivation and performance, or worse, walking out the door. Can you really afford that?

Creating Your Threshold Policy 

Creating the policy isn't hard but it does take some thought and a willingness to stand by the policy even in hard times when you just desperately need to fill that vacancy in the team. Developing the policy starts way back at your Organisational Values. In previous posts we have spoken about the need to really understand your values and that there are really 3 types of values - Permission to Play Values (or Threshold Values), Core Values and Aspirational Values.

Your Threshold or Permission to Play values create the foundation of your policy, if you want Humble and Hungry people to join your team who are also going to have some empathy then these are the things that your policy must help you search for. You will have specific criteria that legally you want them to meet, other behaviour able attributes. 

You should develop methods and questions for identifying these things, it may be a specific interview technique, questions you ask references and even in your psychometric testing.

You may decide that for certain roles the right fit is actually an introverted Thinking person with great emotional intelligence, so you'd be looking for a Myres Brigs type of perhaps an ISTP and so you'd add this to your policy, we will carry out MBTI testing for all new hires.

In some cases, it is actually easier to start with the list of what you don't want and then test for those things as part of your Threshold Policy. A great way of doing this is actually to pick some of your team that in hindsight are not ideal fits and what is it about them that doesn't work... what can you add to your policy to not add any more people like this? 

SummaryEnter heading here...

Getting clear on who you want in and who you don't want in your organisation is probably one of the most critical strategic decisions you can make. It doesn't matter what else you try and accomplish if you have the wrong people it's going to be a whole lot harder to meet your goals, if at all. Developing a Threshold or Red Rope policy isn't hard but you do need to be willing to make some hard choices. Start with the values you really want as a minimum in your organisation, think about what's missing and what you want to add or grow (aspirational values). Most of all, be fussy, this is your organisation and you shouldn't let just anyone walk through the door, the results can be disastrous.


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You can also call John on 0211649739 to set up a meeting 

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Wednesday, 22 May 2019

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